Hírlevél

 

 

Sponsors:



Hotel partners:


 


 


 

 

 

National Theatre Budapest

HUNGARIAN FEAST
(Magyar ünnep)

Hungarian with English subtitles

Venue
NATIONAL THEATRE, Gobbi Hilda Stage
Date
3 december 2011, 15:00
Duration
175' with one intermission
Tickets
3000 HUF
061 373 0964; 061 373 0996
andrea.bossak@nemzetiszinhaz.hu
edit.horvath@nemzetiszinhaz.hu

photo by Eszter Gordon
Gallery ►

Róbert Alföldi was born in 1967. Jászai Mari Prize awarded actor, stage director and institutional director first of the Bárka Theatre, then of the National Theatre Budapest. He started direct for stage in 1995. His own adaptation of Tristan and Isolde was received with large controversy. Since then he directs continuously, his work was recognized and awarded by the public and the professionals as well.

Cast

Mari Nagy, Andrea Söptei, István Znamenák, Ádám Földi, Dávid Szatory, Tamás Szabó Kimmel, Kata Gáspár, Pál Závada, Bence Mátyássy

With

Óbudai Danubia Zenekar Chamber Ensemble, conductor: István Silló

Chorus

Sára Dezső, Zoltán Gradsach, Dóra Halas, Balázs Hiller, Kornél Mikecz, Márta Murányi, Zsófia Nagy, Kinga Marjatta Pap, Júlia Simon, József Szabó, Barna Szász

Music

Máté Bella

Set Design

Róbert Menczel

Costume Design

Anni Füzér

Dramaturg

Róbert Vörös

Chorus-Master

Dóra Halas

Director's Assistent

Rita Herpai

Written by

Pál Závada

Directed by

Róbert ALFÖLDI

Pál Závada was born in 1954. He is a drama and prose writer, editor and sociologist. He got József Attila Prize in 1998, and Kossuth Prize in 2005. His famous novel, Jadviga's pillow appeared in 1997, which was sold over 50 000 copies and was adapted to cinema. The film by Krisztina Deák won several awards.

Hungarian writers were invited to the National Theatre to write one play each based on one of the Ten Commandments. Závada Pál wrote his play based on the third: “Remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy!” The play was nominated the Best New Hungarian Drama by the Hungarian Theatre Critics’ Association, and the performance won the award for The Best Theatre Music in 2011.

The play deals with events in Transylvania and Hungary on the eve of the Second World War, drawing on stylistic elements of classic Greek tragedies.

1940. Early autumn. The country is euphoric after the Vienna Awards – after getting Transylvania back. Relatives and friends meet at photographer Weiner Janka’s home to talk about the fateful events and other important matters of Hungary while enjoying a meal of good bean soup and fresh bread.