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Sea Levander - or the Euphoria of Being

The Symptoms

 

Friday, 2 December, 5.30 pm

Vígszínház

105 minutes

Performed in Hungarian with simultaneous English translation and surtitles

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Photo: Csaba Mészáros

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Performed by:

Emese Cuhorka

Éva Fahidi

 

Dramaturg: Krisztián Peer, Anna Zsigó

Lights: Attila Szirtes

Directed by: Réka Szabó

Date of first night: 13. October, 2015

 

 

WHO? The duet of a 90 year Auschwitz-Birkenau survivor and a young dancer about the euphoria of life. The Symptoms has been an influential member of the Hungarian dance scene for the past 10 years. The company knows no genre boundaries, treating text and movement as equal elements in their performances. Éva Fahidi, the author of the memoir The Soul of Things is a frequent speaker of the Holocaust forums, especially in Germany. Emese Cuhorka is an obstinate boundary-crosser, a brave, venturous performer, who, after many international successes, came back to work again with Réka Szabó, the leader of the Symptoms.

WHAT? Éva is a passionate joy seeker, while Emese always wants to save everybody. Éva has a habit of never saying goodbye. Emese likes to return home. Their common mother tongue is dance. Éva is one of the last witnesses. Her carefully preserved young woman’s clothes seem to have been tailored on Emese’s figure. Emese is tall, Éva still sees herself as a tall person. They are very similar. The performance is about the gap between an elderly woman living with the memory of the Holocaust and a young woman of our times, about the empathy with each other’s position, about growing old, about living in an old and young body – told with humour, honesty and empathy.

WHY? The stake and main question of the performance is whether there is a passage possible between the two worlds, can the experience be conveyed, or vice versa: is it possible to understand the problems of a present-day youngster with such a weighty life behind us as the one bestowed upon Éva, the Holocaust survivor. Is their big common dance even possible?